Thursday, September 12, 2013

Law Insurance


A contract in which one party agrees to indemnify another against a predefined category of risks in exchange for a premium.  Depending on the contract, the insurer may promise to financially protect the insured from the loss, damage, or liability stemming from some event.  An insurance contract will almost always limit the amount of monetary protection possible.


In the absence of insurance, three possible individuals bear the burden of an economic loss; the individual suffering the loss; the individual causing the loss via negligence or unlawful conduct; or lastly, a particular party who has been allocated the burden by the legislature, such as employers under Workmen's Compensation statutes.
While types of insurance vary widely, their primary goal is to allocate the risks of a loss from the individual to a great number of people. Each individual pays a "premium" into a pool, from which losses are paid out. Regardless of whether the particular individual suffers the loss or not the premium is not returnable. Thus, when a building burns down, the loss is spread to the people contributing to the pool. In general, insurance companies are the safekeepers of the premiums. Because of its importance in maintaining economic stability, the government and the courts use a heavy hand in ensuring these companies are regulated and fair to the consumer.

What Sort of Malpractice Insurance Does a Law Firm Need

Most businesses need a plan for dealing with unexpected situations. Usually, that plan includes insurance policies. But law firms and lawyers face unique circumstances most other professions never face. So what sorts of insurance should law firms obtain to best manage their risks?
Any attorney in private practice should carry malpractice insurance. One misstep in a case could lead to liability to a client who sues for malpractice. Fighting a malpractice case can cost thousands of dollars, and an adverse judgment could cost even more. If a claim does arise, malpractice insurance can serve as an important financial buffer for the lawyer and law firm and can provide for legal defense fees, meaning an attorney with more experience in malpractice cases can handle your case for you.